The coulomb scattering looks very easy, the formula of the differential cross section in CM frame is,

\frac{d\sigma}{d\Omega} = (\frac{Z1 Z2 e}{4 E_{cm}})^2 \frac{1}{sin^4(\theta_{cm}/2)},

where e = 1.44 MeV fm and 1 fm^2 = 10 mb. The tricky point is, in most experiment, we are working in Laboratory frame that require frame transformation.

The relationship of the energy in CM frame and the energy in the Lab frame can be found by Lorentz transform, and use the total kinematic energy (both particle 1 and particle 2). In the CM frame, we can image we have a fixed virtual target on the center of mass, and there is only 1 object moving at energy of the total kinematic energy.

For example, we have a target of mass m_2, a projectile with mass m_1 and energy T_1, a classical energy in CM frame is

E_{cm} = \frac{m_2}{m_1+m_2} T_1

In fact the E_{cm} has only 5% difference between relativistic and non-relativistic even up to 500 MeV

When calculating the integrated cross section, we can do it in the CM frame, but it is more intuitive to do it in the Lab frame. In this case, we need to transform the differential cross section from the CM frame to the Lab frame, mathematically, the transformation is done by a factor called Jacobian.

We can compare the result using the kinematic calculator in LISE++.

Screenshot from 2016-04-22 01:08:55.png

In the above plot, the blue line is the d.s.c. in CM frame, and the red line is d.s.c. of the 9Be in Lab frame. Jacobian was added, therefore, the zero degree d.s.c. of 9Be is larger than the 180 degree d.s.c. in the CM frame.

Screenshot from 2016-04-22 01:25:11.png

The grazing angle of the scattering, can be calculated by the shorted distance between the target and the projectile. In the Lab frame, the target is not fixed, so it is not easy to know the shortest distance. But in the CM frame, the virtual target is fixed, and we can calculate the distance using the E_{cm} and \theta_{cm}.

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