My current position is developing a computational program that can measure the system of polarized target automatically and repeatedly. The program needs to connect with the microwave generator, voltage supply, power meter, and oscilloscope. That is purely technical and nothing special.

Later, after the program started to collecting data, another program is needed to analysis the data. Although there are many program that can do analysis, but those program are not so easy to use, in both control and display. So, I make an analysis program. The program is simply read the 2-D time-domain signal, and then determine some parameters of a specific function that fit the signal. However, the signal could be very noisy, so FFTW and wavelet analysis were implemented. That’s why the wavelet analysis appeared in this blog.

After that, the sample of polarized target is made from various pentacene derivatives, that no known energy level exist. One way to find out the energy levels of the singlet excited states is to measure the absorption spectrum. However, the energy of the triplet state is difficult to measure. And the energy level of the triplet state is critical for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization to be happened. Thus, one way to find out is doing computation chemistry.

My last chemistry class was like 15 years ago, when I was junior high school. But the basic of computation chemistry is solving the Schrodinger equation. That is what theoretical nuclear physicists do! The variation method, the Hartree-fock method, I heard it and somehow know it, but never do it with my own hand and computer. That is why I revisit the Hartree-fock method, and found out my previous understanding is so naive.

In the course of studying Hartree-Fock method, and one problem is evaluating the overlap integral

\displaystyle \int \psi_a(r_1) \psi_b(r_2) \frac{1}{r_{12}} \psi_c(r_1) \psi_d(r_2) dr_1dr_2

For a 3-D system, the integral involves product of multiple spherical harmonics. That is really troublesome. Therefore, I move to study the spherical harmonics, and the related rotational invariant, Wigner D-matrix, Clebcsh-Gordon series and Fourier series.  The spherical harmonics arises from solving the Laplace equation in spherical coordinate. A general theory of the solution of Lapalace equation involves Legendre polynomial, which is a special case for Hypergeometric function.  And a very interesting connection is that the elliptical function of the 1st and 2nd kind are also two special cases of hypergeometric function, that, the solution of Laplace equation for elliptical boundary condition is elliptical functions. That connects spherical harmonics and elliptical function! Wow!

I am now a bit off-track, that I am very interesting on the function of all functions. We know that there are many elementary functions, such as sin, cos, and Log. And even more kind of special functions, such as

  • Hermite — solving 1-D harmonic oscillator
  • Laguerre — the radial function of hydrogen
  • Legendre — the solution of the “\theta” of  Laplace equation
  • Gamma — a continuation of factorial
  • Bessel — solution of 3-D infinite square well
  • Elliptic — magnetic field of a solenoid
  • Dirac delta
  • Gaussian or Error function

For discrete argument

  • Clebsch-Gordon
  • Factoral
  • Binomial

As far as I know, the Hypergemetric function is like “mother of functions”, although not all special functions can be expressed as it. I am driven by curiosity, so, I am not sure where I will go. For instance, the transformation of Hypergeometric function is very interesting.

So, for now, as an ending, I found one article is very interesting. The History and Future of Special Functions, by Stephen Wolfram.

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